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Investing to Retire Early

by Guest

Is time running out?
Preparing for your retirement is a task that should never be ignored. While most people would like to “deal with it later”, saving early for this soon-to-be stage of your life can make a huge difference in the future, particularly if you desire to quit your job and enjoy life sooner. Investing to retire early will help you not experience as much anxiety and worry later in your life knowing that you have taken care of it before time.

Early Retirement Planning

Here are 4 basic investing pointers to help you get on track to retiring early:

  1. Always be realistic. Keep in mind that retirement is very costly. Since the economy is not in its best shape, you and your spouse should discuss about beginning to save for early retirement. For a couple, team work and team effort are necessary. You need to review your way of living and make a new dexterous budget plan.
  2. Preparing for retirement means you should open and establish a retirement plan like an Individual Retirement Account (IRA), or a special bank account that will earn interest over a period of time. This is one of the most excellent ways to embark on the retirement investing process. Make sure that you review your employer’s profit sharing plan or pension plan. These are small investments that you put a small percentage of your income into, but can generate huge amounts of money that goes directly into your retirement account. Don’t forget to check the current and best IRA rates and even with your current employer about all the different types of retirement accounts that are available to you.
  3. Investing to retire early calls for seeking tax-sheltered savings plan, like a 401(k) account. Some employers furnish this option, and if yours does, then contribute the highest amount that you can. With this option, your taxes will be lower and your employer may match your contribution. In addition, automatic deductions will make it easier for you to put aside more money for retirement.
  4. Always stick to your financial plan, and never be impulsive in making decisions. This is very significant when saving for your future. Remember that all investment opportunities come with risk. Thus, studying all the possible consequences before committing to an investment will ensure that you’ll not experience financial losses. Look for opportunities for free investment advice.

Investing to retire early can be done successfully by careful assessment and consideration of the available investment options. The chief key is to be practical and rational about your present financial situation. You should be able to realize that it takes a great deal of researching as well as disciplining oneself to achieve your investment goals or any financial objective.

This is a guest post from the editor of Qwoter.com. Whether you are new to investing in the stock market, or have been trading for decades, you will find helpful stock market advice, investment tips, trading strategies, retirement advice and more.

photo credit: thinkpanama

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{ 13 comments… read them below or add one }

Mrs. Accountability March 17, 2010 at 7:31 am

I wish I’d followed this advice years ago, or even that I had the money to start saving now… I’m going to share this information with my son so he won’t be in my boat 25 years from now.

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Bucksome March 19, 2010 at 8:01 am

Mrs. Accountability, I wish I’d followed it years ago as well. It’s better now than never!

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Random Thoughts of a Jersey Mom March 17, 2010 at 9:44 am

Those are great advice. The earlier you start, the more you’ll have by the time you decide to retire. J and I want to become financially independent as soon as we can; you never know what’ll happen in the future.
.-= Random Thoughts of a Jersey Mom´s last blog ..Emergency Now! =-.

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Thought Bubble Ten March 17, 2010 at 6:04 pm

I don’t plan to retire. I’ve got way too many things I still want to do and retiring just ain’t one of them. ‘Sides, I plan to live beyond 110, so I expect to see a lot of changes in the way we organize ourselves and our finances. I’ll be keeping a close watch :)
.-= Thought Bubble Ten´s last blog ..Blog posts and comments – Why bother? =-.

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Bucksome March 19, 2010 at 7:59 am

I plan to retire, but not necessarily stop working. Retirement will be an opportunity to indulge my work efforts on only what I want to do instead of what I have to do. I won’t take a paid job because I want freedom to set my schedule.

P.S. If you figure out how to live past 110, let me know!

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Austin March 22, 2010 at 8:30 pm

That is some great advice. The sooner one starts the better it is — would give you the freedom to retire when you feel like. As rightly mentioned by Bucksome — it could give you an opportunity to indulge you work efforts on what you want to do instead of the usual 9 – 5 day job.

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Bucksome March 23, 2010 at 6:19 am

Austin, it is good advice I wish I followed thirty years ago.

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Austin @ TheOrangePaper.com March 23, 2010 at 9:03 am

Delayed gratification is the key here. If one wants to retire early — start saving early and investing early — then allow the Power of Compounding to work its magic:

http://www.theorangepaper.com/saving-money/power-of-compounding.html

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Bucksome March 25, 2010 at 6:47 am

Can’t argue with the power of compound interest!

Thought Bubble Ten March 25, 2010 at 6:43 am

Hi Bucksome, my blog has been restored after being deleted by Google for spam (not!).. Just wanted to let you know that I’m back :)
.-= Thought Bubble Ten´s last blog .."Understanding life? " Seriously, do I give a toss?? =-.

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Bucksome March 25, 2010 at 6:48 am

Sorry, you had to go through that. I’ve heard on twitter that it was happening. That’s why many have moved to Wordpress.

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Invest It Wisely July 16, 2010 at 9:27 am

Time is definitely on your side when investing young. I just wish I had really started about, oh, 10 years earlier ;) Oh well, I am still young!

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Bucksome July 18, 2010 at 8:26 pm

Time is not on my side, but I hope others can learn from those of us that didn’t invest early enough. I’m glad you’re still young!

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